Update: Quilts for Pulse

It’s been a couple of weeks since the shooting in Orlando occurred. In an effort to help the survivors and the victims families, the Orlando MQG has started a quilt drive.

Thank you to Kathy, Cathy, and Morgan for the two tops and stack of blocks that were dropped off at the June meeting. Thank you to Karen @cosmicquilting, who has volunteered to quilt the tops on her long arm.

Our guild is collecting materials to send to the Orlando MQG. Karen A. will be at the July 10th Sew, as well as the July 28th Meeting to collect materials.

We can send the following:

  1. Binding
  2. Backing fabric
  3. Blocks (make 1. make a bunch. any quantity) – 10″ square
  4. Tops (at least 48″ x 60″ but no larger than a twin) – Please include a label
  5. Completed quilts – Please include a label

Important Date: July 28, 2016 – Karen A. will be collecting all materials to send in one package to Orlando MQG. If you wish to make something, but cannot make these meetings, please email Karen at aalders.karen@gmail.com.

For the blocks/tops/quilts, here is what the Orlando MQG blog says:

Can I use a block other than the one you showed?
By all means, do your thing. I chose the block so everyone could take part. I know there are plenty of heart blocks out there and feel free to use anything you’d like. I only ask that your quilt includes a heart or hearts of some sort, and that its mostly brights and/or rainbow. I chose brights and rainbow to represent not only the LGBT flag, but also ALL of the different people affected by the event. I also want them to be cheerful, and want the recipients to know that these are created with love, given with love, and in using them, they will be covered with love. I want them to be comforted knowing that even strangers care and that they did not go through this without the support of others

The MQG posted additional patterns/options for hearts. Some of the options are shown below.

There’s a block pattern by Cluck Cluck sew that is very easy to make and finishes at 10″

heart2bblocks2bin2bmultiple2bsizes
Photo, Design, and Piecing by Cluck Cluck Sew

If you make many of these blocks, you’ll end up with many HST – which Jay Bird Quilts has created a large heart block to use those scraps. Six blocks can make one quilt that is just about a twin quilt. #BigHeartBlock

heart2bfor2bpulse2b8
Block photo, design, piecing by Jay Bird Quilts

Another fun block to try is by Threaded Quilting Studio. This is a paper pieced block. #ModernHeart

Screen Shot 2016-07-01 at 5.03.14 PM
Photo, Design, and piecing by Threaded Quilting Studios

Love Free Wins block by Amanda Hines of What the Bobbin? This is also paper pieced and finishes at  10″

love-wins-rainbow
Photo and Design by Amanda Hines

Modern Star and Modern Log Cabin Challenge

The OCMQG holds a challenge once a quarter for its members to show off their creativity and have some fun. See the Challenges Page for our current challenge and challenge details.

For the first quarter 2016, the challenge is about taking a traditional state star block or log cabin block and making it modern.

Take 30 seconds and think about / write down what “making it modern” means to you.

Below are images from Google Image searches on “California Star Quilt Blocks” and “Log Cabin Quilt Blocks” – which are showing mostly traditional ways of creating the blocks.

Screen Shot 2016-02-07 at 9.46.24 AMScreen Shot 2016-02-07 at 9.47.27 AM

How can the modern aesthetic be brought to these blocks to create a modern quilt? Well, first – what the heck defines a quilt as “modern?” This question is hotly debated and is as controversial as “should you prewash your fabrics?”

Basically, modern quilting has no rules. The individual quilter decides what rules to follow or not follow. For example, in traditional quilting, there’s usually a standard sized block that is repeated in rows and columns, has one or more borders, and uses traditional fabrics.

What rules do you “break” or “bend” when translating traditional into modern?

One way to make the block modern is to use a solid “background” fabric to create negative space and to use modern patterned fabrics (right) or to use only solid fabrics (left).

Screen Shot 2016-02-07 at 10.11.39 AM
Made in 2013 by an OCMQG member

Another way is to super size the block and show off one block or a part of the block. The quilt to the right is a traditional block called Ohio Star. The OCMQG member who made this blew up the block to the size of the quilt and used saturated solid fabrics.

These three example all use precise measuring and piecing, but move away from the traditional in the fabric choice and block size.

Other ways to make it modern:

  1. Use only scissors to cut the block pieces (no rotary cutters or rulers)
  2. Make the pattern “wonky.” In a log cabin, the sides of each strip are usually parallel to each other – What would it look like if they weren’t? What happens when a star block made with 60 degree triangles now has triangles that vary between 45 degrees and 90 degrees?
  3. Use “found” fabric. Old jeans, ties, button down shirts, slacks, bedsheets, towels, curtains can all be used to make a quilt. How do different fabric types affect the look and feel of the quilt?
  4. Create blocks and align them so a large amount of negative space is created

Join the conversation – Tell us your favorite ways of making traditional patterns into your version of “modern.”

Follow our hash tags for this challenge on Instagram #ocmodernstar and #ocmodernlc